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Old 21-05-2009, 05:05 PM   #1
tastic1
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Anyone know anything about this?

http://www.alanmarques.com/1884_trailer.html

Looks interesting.
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Old 21-05-2009, 05:21 PM   #2
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Yes, they've been trying to get it off the ground for a number years now. Terry Gilliam was very interested although I'm not sure if he's still attached to the project. Alan Marques worked at Magic Camera Company as was at Shepperton doing digital work but subsequently joined another digital FX company in Soho IIRC. Unfortunately I can't remember which one. Bill Pearson is the frame for doing the model work if it happens.
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Old 22-05-2009, 11:21 AM   #3
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For a change it's an ORIGINAL idea
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Old 22-05-2009, 11:46 AM   #4
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not entirely original, unfortunately. Obvious influences include "First men in the moon" and the role-playing game "Space: 1889", both of which include period space travel of some description, and the book "The Time Ships", by Stephen Baxter. (An authorised sequel to "The Time Machine" where the time traveller returns to rescue Weena but is thwarted as he has altered the timelines."

Originality is relative, dependant on what you have encountered before.


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Old 22-05-2009, 01:27 PM   #5
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It owes more than a nod to The Wild Wild West. Anything "steampunk" is bound to look the same.
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Old 22-05-2009, 05:52 PM   #6
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At least it doesn't have sodding Keanu (I can give acting lessons to a plank of wood) Reeves in it
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Old 23-05-2009, 07:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaponsmith View Post
Originality is relative, dependant on what you have encountered before.
I like that saying. Concise and true! (Was that a quote, or an original observation? Either way, it's a good 'un. Mind if I steal it?!)


On the general "Steampunk" theme:

I just got in the #13 issue of "Sci-Fi & Fantasy Modeller". Way up front, on the contents page, the editor said the things below, which interested me. (As both a reader and writer.) I'm curious: does anyone here (besides me!?) have plans to submit something for this? I have a few ideas in mind -- some of which I'll hold close to my vest, for now -- and I had previously (as I was submitting my Dark Star article's text; with Tom Seiler's photos of that film's spaceship model) made a few suggestions of folks that might be interested in submitting stuff ... a few people whose Steampunk models I'd seen in mags or on the web, such as William Wardrop or Dan Thompson ... and I guess I'm rambling a bit, but I'm just hyper / excited that the idea the SFFM folks had, some months ago, is now 'Public Knowledge'. I'm wondering if other readers are also excited; and if other authors here will submit stuff for the upcoming Steampunk special issue?



"Birth of a notion....

As we were putting these pages together and also editing and designing Volume II of Modelling the 21st. Century (please check out the ad on page 43 (bugfix: should be 81)) David and myself got to thinking. More specifically, it was the Invisible Man and Victorian Phaser features in this issue that resulted in this outside the box synaptic process taking place... Wouldn't it be a great idea, we deliberated, if, say, next year, we could put together a modelling book that celebrated 'Steampunk' -- you know, the type of imaginative genre modelling that embraces what-if futuristic technology and hardware concepts and sets them in the Victorian/Edwardian age...

What would a Steampunk ray-gun look like, for example? Or a spaceship? Or a killer robot? Or a time machine? We passed our fevered thoughts on to our esteemed modellers and, rather than send a white van round for us with an invitation to step inside and enjoy a nice little break in a rubber room, they began to jump up and down with excitement. Cool, they said. Right, we said. So that's sorted, then.

Next year, therefore, you can also expect, in addition to our regular issues and specials -- ahem ...

Messrs. Reccia and Openshaw's Colourful Compendium of Scaled Scientific and Fantastical Contraptions, Craft, Apports and Devices.

If you're a Steampunk modeller we'd love to showcase your creations... after all, the more Scaled Scientific and Fantastical Contraptions, Craft, Apports and Devices we can feature, the better. Please get in touch (info@scififantasymodeller.co.uk) if you're making something (or are about to make something) you feel would fit the bill -- we'd be delighted to hear from you."
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Old 23-05-2009, 08:02 PM   #8
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Thanks for that Wardster. It was an original thought, one of a dying breed these days it seems, but as I posted it on a public forum I doubt I could stop anyone else from using it now.

I am also thankful for the heads-up on the SF&FM Steampunk special coming out next year. Not only do I love this sort of idea, I would love to get some of my work in one of their esteemed publications, so may have to adjust the plans for some of my future models - Steampunk Dalek, anyone?
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Old 25-05-2009, 01:13 PM   #9
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Who finds Steampunk of an amorating nature?

WE DO!

Brassgoggles- the Lighter Side of Steampunk

Brassgoggles Steampunk Forum

Have a look in the 'Tactile' section of the above forum, lots of very talented individuals making some very creative Neo-Victoriana!

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Old 25-05-2009, 07:13 PM   #10
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Awesomeness, guys! I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one excited about SFFM's idea!

Personally, I hope they end up getting so many cool submissions that they have to do a Volume Two, later on!

I'll definitely check out any Steampunks links ... thanks for including those!

One direction I'd like to invite people to check out would be historical submarines from the 1800s. Most of them are little-known, to say the least. Research into them, on the whole, has been rather spotty. Errors and urban myths are all too common.

One exception, researcher-wise, is Mark K. Ragan. He's largely rewritten the history books, on that subject. Others have, of course, added to what's known, and/or have shown that past theories had too many holes in them to be credible, given other, more solid evidence ... but Ragan, in my opinion, is the leading researcher into old submarines, slash writer, slash "populizer". His books have gone through multiple rewrites, as his on-going research through the National Archives and other places have made his own (very advanced for the time) research efforts out-of-date ... he is, as far as I'm concerned, so far ahead of most other researchers, that it isn't funny! Check out "Submarine Warfare in the Civil War,""Submarine Warfare in the Civil War," and you'll see what I mean. That book made me wonder why he's one of the only people researching the subject, regularly. I mean, come on ... how could a person not want to know more about this crazy model:



Personally, my two "wanna build a model of that" favorite subs or semi-submersibles from that period are the Confederate machines, CSS Pioneer and CSS Manassas. There are only two known drawings of the former; and the disinformation about the latter is simply stunning. (Research into that one's pretty much at the "start over, people" stage! Not to toot my own horn, overly much, but I believe I have potentially added to the understanding of that one -- by taking a dockside, in-person sketch of it, and figuring out the shape in 3D. The bow is of particular importance, as it was build-able at the time period; and looks so COOL!)







This thing sat incredibly low in the water; had steam engines pushing it; and the first 20 feet of the bow was solid wood; probably with an iron tip. It was part sub; part torpedo (as we use the word, today) ... and came about when wooden sailing ships were still "it"!

The CSS Manassas was an ironclad ram -- one that, in my opinion as an amateur but dedicated researcher, scared the poop out of the sailing ship officers on the federal side of the American Civil War. That machine may be findable, and Clive Cussler is sure he knows where it is; and has said exactly where, publicly --

http://www.numa.net/expeditions/mana..._arkansas.html

-- but no one's interested, apparently, in digging that one up. I wish they would do so, and give it the "Hunley treatment": full-on study of it, inch by inch. I'm convinced, from looking into it, that the thing was a huge influence on future boat-building. (The story told to kids in schools is that the ironclads "Monitor and the Merrimac" (CSS Virginia) changed history, by showing that wooden sailing ships were obsolete. Too bad the Manassas pre-dated both of those better-known vessels ... and caused, during its first attack, mass panic!)

The history of the Manassas, I'm convinced, is still largely cloudy. Disinformation spread by the Union, after the thing caused their Captains to abandon ship during its first outing, tended to sell the story that the thing was ineffective, and of no real military value. I'd bet that study of the real thing would tell a tale unlike any the North or South once spread.

Other CSS Manassas links ... with unique research tidbits, which tell quite a tale:

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/s...r/manassas.htm

http://www.ijnhonline.org/volume1_nu...ockade.doc.htm



Photos of early submarines that actually exist, today, in museums:

http://www.hunley.org/

http://www.williammaloney.com/Aviati...nRam/index.htm

http://www.williammaloney.com/Aviati...Sub1/index.htm




Models and research info about the USS Alligator submarine -- which was so obscure that even the modern-day Navy forgot all about, until the last couple of decades!

http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/alligator/welcome.html

http://www.navyandmarine.org/alligat...galligator.htm

http://vabiz.com/d&e/CABAL/fifteenth...tta-part-2.htm



The only two known historical drawings of the CSS Pioneer -- one an orthographic view of the outlines of the thing, with some interior detailing shown; the other, a sketch showing what I believe to be 1820s era (very small) iron plates, being recycled from then-obsolete railroad equipment -- low cost, junkyard materials -- patched together, to make forms that probably looked like a patchwork monster (Frankenstein, the submarine!) in the 1860s. I could go on about that, but I'll just point you towards the link, and say "imagine..." :-)

http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08448.htm

The good knews about the Pioneer is that Ragan came up with an US Naval engineering study of the thing, in the National Archives: so, proportions and outlines and contours are very easy to figure out, for scale modeling purposes. (Nevertheless, many people who've made kits of the subject got those three critical things wrong; probably due to not knowing that engineering study existed: previous to Ragan's discovery of that drawing, only a sketch of it existed ... which, I've discovered, would be highly useful as far as knowing how the thing looked, as far as surface texturing and the like: panel placement, and riveting.)



Photos and (incomplete, sometimes buggy) research on another 1860s submarine:

http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/submarine/sub_clues.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayou_S...rate_Submarine



And finally, a modern-day modeler's page about Confederate Torpedo Boats:

http://www.steelnavy.com/CSS%20torpedo%20boats.htm

Last edited by Wardster; 25-05-2009 at 07:15 PM. Reason: minor typo
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Old 26-05-2009, 08:09 AM   #11
tastic1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the DOCTOR View Post
Who finds Steampunk of an amorating nature?

WE DO!

Brassgoggles- the Lighter Side of Steampunk

Brassgoggles Steampunk Forum

Have a look in the 'Tactile' section of the above forum, lots of very talented individuals making some very creative Neo-Victoriana!



Met a modelmaker who works with Bill Pearson who said this project started life as a puppet/cartoon animation in 1977 so it predates the Naffo term Steampunk somewhat.
I think the real term is 'Jules Vernian'!
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