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50" Eagle Scratch Build (PIC HEAVY!)

SteveDix

Alphans
hmmm... I know a little bit about electronics - a very little, largely what I picked up from my production-engineer father. The problem with that board is it's surface-mount technology, probably flow-soldered on a machine. SMT is notoriously difficult to rework - ie desolder the LEDs - without specialist tools and a steady hand. Even if you succeed, you may damage the components by overheating. SMT rework is such a specialist thing that most of the time they chuck the boards away, rather than bothering trying to fix.
 
Hey, Steve! :)
I did hear that somewhere....

The entire PCB is working fine and what I want to try is to maybe snip the LEDs about 2mm off of the surface of the PCB, to give the new solder something to attach to. This is what I also did at the power lead solderpoints, too.
 
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Jeff2

Alphans
hmmm... I know a little bit about electronics - a very little, largely what I picked up from my production-engineer father. The problem with that board is it's surface-mount technology, probably flow-soldered on a machine. SMT is notoriously difficult to rework - ie desolder the LEDs - without specialist tools and a steady hand. Even if you succeed, you may damage the components by overheating. SMT rework is such a specialist thing that most of the time they chuck the boards away, rather than bothering trying to fix.

I tend to agree. Looking at the pictures of the board, it would be tricky to apply enough heat to desolder the LED's without dislodging what appear to be SMT resistors. This is because of the very close proximity of the LEDs to the SMT components.

How about an alternative? Why not use clear plastic (or similar) as a "light pipe" to redirect the light from the LEDs to the locations you desire?
 
Hmmm, In that case, think I need to speak to my telecoms friend and see if he can get me some more fibre optic cable off cuts. The last thing I want to do is dislodge anything, so I will listen to what sounds like very sage advice to me.....

Thank you, Gentlemen, I am extremely grateful to you.
 

Jeff2

Alphans
If you could get some fiber optic scraps I'd think you could route the light from the LEDs to multiple spots on the backside of the display panels. I'd say it's certainly worth a try.
 

wappynutter

Alphans
Darren get yourself off down the local "PoundWorld", "PoundLand" " B&M stores" or any of the similar "99p" type shops.
My local had a handful of battery powered fibreoptic colour changing lamps in stock last year.
The type with the RGB slow colour change LED in a silver tabletop base and a removable fibreoptic fan that sits in a hole above the LED.

97_87_l.jpg

Found an image of a similar product on-line.:yes:
Loads of fibreoptic plus a slow change 3 colour LED and circuitboard to boot...:thumbup:
Goodluck mate keep up the amazing work.

Regards Andy :D
 
Thanks for that, Jerry...
I took your advice and picked up a couple of units for about £5 / $8 inluding shipping. Plus, I can cannibalise the lighting out of them, too. :)
Thanks again!
 

eagle2010

Alphans
Your welcome Darren. Ya, the ones I got have a similar board like you were trying to modify. They have a quarter size board with 3 LEDs. (Blue,red and green). I'm going to use mine to illuminate the console controls as well. Good luck!
 
Thanks Mate. I think the colour change is a little less abrupt than I would ultimately like but beggars can't be choosers! Goos luck with yours, too!
 
Okay, I finally managed to get back online! I managed to make a start on the lighting for the cockpit interior. I have done quite a bit more than the photo suggests, but I thought that some of you might be interested to see the lights I am using. These are waterproof and have an adhesive strip on the back. Each block of three has a built in resistor, so you can wire them directly to a 12v supply in mutiples of three. My brother then rain checked his visit, so I have had to put the cockpit on hold (again!) until he can find the time to pop around and give me some help and advice.



No matter! I have finally revisited the Passenger pod and have been pushing that along instead. I have now made the other sliding door for the rear end of the pod and have painted and numbered them both. This meant that I could then get on with detailing the interior end walls, which I have also now completed.

The seating will go in the area to the right and the computer banks with table and chair will go on the left. That's why the tramlines to the left of the door are not finished. They will be hidden by the computer banks.
DISCLAIMER: the wall is not glued into place in these photos, so that is why the door is not straight. It came slightly off of its runner...that is no longer an issue now that the wall is permanently glued in place.



Likewise, the unpainted walls either side of the door, in the photo below, will be hidden by the EVA suit racks.



I know this is a little update but I will be moving this along more rapidly now. I hope to get the interior knocked into better shape in the coming week. Thanks, as always, for looking in and more soon! :)
 
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Thanks ALPHA :)
I have started experimenting with different methods of suspension for the eagle legs. So far, the best method I have found is to use the spring mechanism found in a propelling pencil. These springs take about 3lbs of pressure to compress them so they are ideal for this job.

These pics show a mock-up that I have built, just to ensure that the thing works. It is far from pretty but it serves the purpose. I can refine it later when I make the final four. I just have to attach the jointed hinge to the upright to test that it all works together.




My eagle shouldn't weigh much more than 6, possibly 7lbs when complete, so these springs should be ample to support it.



These last two images show the amount of compression the suspension will allow. I may increase it a little...

 
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Thanks, joe.
The pads are just two pieces of foam board, completely encased in .040 styrene sheet. It makes them very light and very strong. This is just a test piece though, to help me design the landing gear. I will maybe make them out of something else when I actually build them.

Shornak, you make a very valid point. I think that my eagle has no weight because there is no brass work, no weighty resin parts and no metal engine bells or thrusters. As for the interior, the pieces weigh next to nothing. I admit that I am 'guesstimating' the eventual weight of my eagle but I am also confident that the landing gear will take up to 3lbs per corner and there is little chance that the finished model will Weigh as much as 12lbs.
I guess that time will tell...
 
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I have spent the last couple of days making and applying greeblies to the outside of the forward walkway. I have had to kind of use the few images that are available to me, and make the rest up...I am not too bothered because once the cross pieces are installed into the cages, and the shoulder pods are in place, the greeblies will be all but unseen.
Here is the port side:


And here is the Starboard side:


I am not sure yet what to do under the shelves but I am, at least reasonably happy with the two top halves. I am hoping they will look better once I have painted them white.
 
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