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Gerry Anderson Super Drone?

techno

Alphans
Hey Guys, I'm planning a Project using a Snaptite SR-71 Blackbird,turning it into a Super Drone. I'm Not Planning to Use the Canopy included,going to save that for Something, just Wondering if i Should Blank Out the Windscreen with Plastic Stock or What? Can Anyone Advise what Would be good Option? Thanks For Looking. Dan
 

Ham Salad

Alphans
Yeah, which kind though is the Question. Dan

Ah, I see where you are now.

Don't use testor's putty. It's awful for any use, doesn't take paint well, doesn't sand well, applies badly, and is expensive.

Typically , there are three types of putty people like to use for modeling. What you use depends on the job.

1. Epoxy based putty

common hobby shop brand is milliput, but you can find this in any hardware store under it's generic name. This is a two part material - mix the two parts and it hardens by catalyzing.

Advantages: hardens fast-catalyses, not dries. Strong and hard. Great for structural parts: can be sanded drilled, carved (about as hard as hard plastic) . Fairly non-toxic: won't burn you or poison you.

Disadvantages: has to used as soon as mixed. Not particularly smooth, so will need sanding and finishing. Not really great for really small areas: lots of waste when used for this. Has little tendency to adhere to the model when applied, so it has to be worked into openings. Probably not best for this particular application (filling small openings). expensive ( a golf ball sized amount will run $5). Once it's mixed, that's it: mix too much, and it's wasted. Will be harder than the plastic, so when sanded in a crack may abrade slower than the plastic surface (to sand smooth you want it to be about the same hardness as the plastic itself, or a bit softer). Hard to get off your hands when dry.

2.Lacquer based putty.

Also called 'automotive glazing putty' . Common brands: 'squadron putty' (hobby shop) , bondo glazing (in auto shops). Comes in tubes ala toothpaste...bondo brand is dark red. This uses lacquer thinner as a solvent. Dry time depends on how thick you put it on- an application that just fills a crack on a model dries in about 20 minutes.

Advantages: very smooth grain (it's for filling scratches and pits in car paint or polyester putty) . Doesn't need too much sanding, takes paint beautifully. Cheap and easy to find: you can get a big tube for about 5$ in any auto parts store in the body work section. Adheres to plastic well because it's solvent softens plastic. It's a bit softer than styrene plastic, so it sands down really well to fill cracks without too much loss of plastic surface. easier to learn to use for the beginner.

Disadvantages: Too thick and it takes a LOONG time to dry: an 1/8 thick application will take overnight to harden. Put it on too thick and it can melt the plastic too. Not terribly strong, a bit brittle: if you want to sculpt a new nose on a model this is not the stuff to use (epoxy) . Strong solvent smell, use only in well ventilated areas. Try not to get it on you skin , laquer thinner is bad for you (well, OK everything is bad for you).

3. Polyester based putty.

Commonly called auto body putty or bondo. Found in auto shops or hardware stores. Two part product, but cheap and comes in large quantity (small can is a pint or so). Mix the hardener, hardens by catalyzing in about 15 minutes or less.

Advantages: About as strong as wood, can be drilled, sanded, sculpted. When it starts to catalyze, it goes through what I call a 'soap' stage for about 5 minutes or so...it hardens to about as hard as a bar of soap, and can be carved and shaped really easily in this stage. You can make a whole model out of this! many professional figure and model makers sculpt their originals out of this, you can make something quite large out of it as it has pretty good structural properties. Plus, new applications will fuze with the old, so you can build up a shape a bit at a time. If you mess up, cut the bad part off and add more, it won't mind! Paints well, sands easily Really cheap by volume ( a quart is about $10).

Disadvantages: Messy, and a skin irritant (don't get the unmixed product on you). Nasty smell, use in a well ventilated area. Doesn't adhere to plastic that well...might pop off. Not really good for small areas...pretty much for big areas and /or sculpting.

***

For what you want, epoxy putty or glazing putty would probably be best...If the canopy areas are open holes you might want to glue a bit of sheet plastic behind the hole first as a backing ( otherwise the putty will just keep gooshing through the hole.) Whatever putty you use, remember the idea is to use as little as you need to use: less is more.

Good luck!
 
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SteveDix

Alphans
3. Polyester based putty.

Disadvantages: Doesn't adhere to plastic that well...might pop off.

You can use this to your advantage : It doesn't stick to styrene, so you can use it to make a simple mould shape : I did the back of the moonmobile that way.
 

Ham Salad

Alphans
You can use this to your advantage : It doesn't stick to styrene, so you can use it to make a simple mould shape : I did the back of the moonmobile that way.

Ah, yes: another creative application of Bondolurgy.

What did you cast into it?
 
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Informative and appreciated...

Mr Salad, thank you for the mini-tutorial about all of the fillers. I don't think I've ever used anything like them at all but, as always with the Forum, it's another gentle nudge along the way to greater modelling. Thanks again for taking the time to educate us.

While I've got your attention, exactly who is that in your avatar? (And I don't mean the Muppet - no hold on I'll qualify that again, I mean who's the distinguished looking gentleman on the right of the picture?) Hope you don't mind me wondering, but I've been puzzling over it for over a year now.....

Kindest regards

Patrick
 

Ham Salad

Alphans
Thanks again for taking the time to educate us.

I dunno about educating...just trying to help. Which doesn't much work very often, as I my own professional modeling experience pretty much ended in 1990, and the way I do things is pretty much obsolete by today's standards. One my old colleges once referred to my '80's era techniques as 'stone knives and bearskins'.


While I've got your attention, exactly who is that in your avatar?

That's Bob Knickerbocker as Ham Salad, from HARDWARE WARS

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077658/fullcredits?ref_=tt_ov_st_sm

The muppet is ( of course) Chuchilla the Wookie Monster.

I love that movie, it's incredibly silly...and the largest grossing short of all time. I highly recommend all of ernie's films, as they are all funny.
 
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techno

Alphans
Thanks for the Advice, i bought some Bondo Glazing putty and plan to use it Thanks for helping me out with this! Dan
 
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