Space 1999 Eagle Transporter Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

  • We have updated the Terms and Conditions, you will be prompted to read and agree to these next time you are active on the forum.
SPONSORED BY

My Superon Tanker

badsimmonds

Alphans
While I was still building my Helijet I also started a Superon Tanker model, the idea was to work on either model while waiting for something to dry etc.
It sort of worked but was quite hard dealing with two models at once.
As usual I have to watch the pennies so I will use whatever I have in the garage.
I decided to make it about 23" long why I don't know but it was lucky as there are a couple of girder bridge parts on either side of the tanks which will fit in well with this size.
After scribbling some details on a piece of wood I transferred my measurements to some mdf I had. I cut out the wheel arches in 6mm mdf and the main chassis out of 12mm mdf. Unfortunately my wood wasn't long enough so I'll have to deal with that problem later. Once glued and dried I add a sloping piece on the rear and also added another 12mm thick piece on top, this was to create the angled shape that goes along the body (it'll make sense later on). There are raised side panels on each side so I used whatever I had but again they weren't long enough, another problem to solve.. Some might say buy longer wood, but that costs money and I want to use up what I already have.
You might see in the photo I have sanded the rear down nearer its correct shape. as this stage you start to think is this going to work as mdf is fibrous after sanding, as I'm making this up as I go along we'll have to wait and see.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3470.JPG
    DSCF3470.JPG
    94.1 KB · Views: 21
  • DSCF3472.JPG
    DSCF3472.JPG
    118.2 KB · Views: 29
  • DSCF3479.JPG
    DSCF3479.JPG
    94.9 KB · Views: 24
Last edited:

badsimmonds

Alphans
A couple of photos didn't transfer for some reason so here they are I hope.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3467.JPG
    DSCF3467.JPG
    112.1 KB · Views: 13
  • DSCF3468.JPG
    DSCF3468.JPG
    129.4 KB · Views: 22

badsimmonds

Alphans
With those pieces well and truly glued it was time to sand and shape them.
For the basic shaping I used an electric sander then used various grades of sandpaper for the fine tuning.
Although mdf is easy to sand it does have a tendency to get a bit fibrous at times depending on the mdf you use. It isn't an issue at the moment as I just want to get the shape more or less right.
Once again it was time for the filler and sanding phase of the build. There is a curved edge along the whole length of the body ( what there is of it at the moment) so this took extra filler and a lot of sanding over a period of days. Getting the curves right at the back was tricky where it curves downwards but I think it turned out ok.
In the meantime I glued some balsa chunks left over from the Helijet project to create the front cabin. Once dry I cut out the basic shape with a saw. Seeing it in place starts to give me an idea of what it might look like.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3605.JPG
    DSCF3605.JPG
    116.7 KB · Views: 31
  • DSCF3598.JPG
    DSCF3598.JPG
    114.1 KB · Views: 32
  • DSCF3490.JPG
    DSCF3490.JPG
    104.6 KB · Views: 17
  • DSCF3485.JPG
    DSCF3485.JPG
    116 KB · Views: 17
  • DSCF3480.JPG
    DSCF3480.JPG
    99.1 KB · Views: 14
Last edited:

badsimmonds

Alphans
After a lot of sanding and even more sanding the cabin is taking shape.
I drilled out the nose using an electric drill to create the recessed area where the lights etc are positioned.
I used filler to help get the shape right especially round the front section, I wasn't bothered about how rough the bottom of the recess was as that would be dealt with later. Eventually I was reasonably satisfied the shape was as close as I could get it so it was time to cover it in fibreglass. I screwed in two screw bolts underneath as they would be fixed in my workmate bench and keep the cockpit clear of everything.
I covered it in about three layers of fibreglass and once that was dry I turned it upside down and finished it off.
I trimmed all the excess off and started the never ending cycle of filling and sanding once again.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3640.JPG
    DSCF3640.JPG
    112.4 KB · Views: 24
  • DSCF3637.JPG
    DSCF3637.JPG
    116.4 KB · Views: 20
  • DSCF3626.JPG
    DSCF3626.JPG
    118.5 KB · Views: 22
  • DSCF3610.JPG
    DSCF3610.JPG
    116.2 KB · Views: 22
  • DSCF3608.JPG
    DSCF3608.JPG
    117.7 KB · Views: 25

badsimmonds

Alphans
Continuing work on the cabin which means filling and sanding endlessly. Every time I spray primer it shows up another defect especially at the front end. Thank god for fibreglass to protect the soft balsa during all this work.
When I worked on my Firefly all it had was a coating of resin which did strengthen the surface but it was still prone to damage during construction.
After spending ages on this phase it was time to move to the window section.
This is always my least favourite part of any model so this time I decided to try another method. I cut out the entire window section with a fine saw making sure the lines were straight then using a chisel I knocked out the balsa leaving a big hole, I hope this works out.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3647.JPG
    DSCF3647.JPG
    117.6 KB · Views: 11
  • DSCF3651.JPG
    DSCF3651.JPG
    116.8 KB · Views: 12
  • DSCF3656.JPG
    DSCF3656.JPG
    114 KB · Views: 14
  • DSCF3670.JPG
    DSCF3670.JPG
    116.6 KB · Views: 16
  • DSCF3671.JPG
    DSCF3671.JPG
    115.9 KB · Views: 33
Pick a window......

.....and I bet you heart was in your mouth cutting out that entire window section - could all have gone so very wrong, BUT, in true badsimmonds fashion, everything ends up intact. Keep us posted because I, for one, cannot remember what this particular vehicle actually looks like. Well done for persevering with all the sanding and filling.....

Kindest regards

Patrick
 

badsimmonds

Alphans
The method I've chosen for the windows on this project is to use a chunk of solid perspex. This was the biggest piece of perspex I've worked with and being 1" thick it is quite heavy.
After fitting the block in place to see what needs to be removed I had no idea how I was going to achieve the required shape on something this size.
Firstly I reduced it in size using a rough saw (the only thing able to cut this) then started sanding. Normally I use my cordless drill for sanding but it did not have the kind of power output for this job so I had to buy an old fashioned electric drill. In the past I have sanded small pieces of perspex for windows and know that all cut edges can be polished up. My Shado Mobile windows were created this way, rough sand the shape then using finer and finer sandpaper, fine tune it then rub it like mad with brasso and then polish with Mr Sheen an hey presto a perfect polished cut end which looks as if it had been moulded that way, I even use the same method if a bit of glue gets on a window.
Back to this window and it took quite a while to sand using the drill, stopping every so often to fit in place and check progress. The perspex will melt with this type of work on it but that's not a problem as you just break it off when cool and start again. I know some people don't like working with the stuff but once you know how it will react it can be a boon to modellers and just treat it with care, I love the stuff.
Eventually I had the basic shape which looks not too bad, I won't polish it till later as its going to have a lot of handling mean time.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3678.JPG
    DSCF3678.JPG
    116.6 KB · Views: 31
  • DSCF3677.JPG
    DSCF3677.JPG
    115.6 KB · Views: 22
  • DSCF3673.JPG
    DSCF3673.JPG
    116 KB · Views: 19
  • DSCF3675.JPG
    DSCF3675.JPG
    117.2 KB · Views: 20
  • DSCF3672.JPG
    DSCF3672.JPG
    115.7 KB · Views: 21
Clearly superior.....

....and this is amazing. Solid block of Perspex - who'd have thought it? Please keep us posted on your progress with the Perspex as the project develops - at some point in the future, I'm going to have to create windows / windscreens / canopies. Understand the principle but would love to see it being done in practice.

Kindest regards

Patrick
 

badsimmonds

Alphans
With the window done for the time being I got started on some of the detail.
As you know there are a number of versions of this vehicle and all of them have different details around the sides and top. There aren't any photos of the top of this particular version but I believe it had a couple of sloping intakes on the roof. My first attempt at them consisted of carving one out of balsa then vacuum form a couple of parts. Unfortunately the end result was rubbish so it was down to the old school method of creating them individually.
I ended up using a length of aluminium tube cut down the middle at an angle.
With a bit of filing they turned out ok. To give more surface to glue onto the roof I super glued a piece of balsa inside, I then glued them to the roof and used filler to blend them in. It took a bit of sanding/filling to get them looking good, then some primer to see any defects and see how they look overall.
It was also time to finally fix the cabin to the front of the chassis. I had to build up the fixing point so the cabin would sit correctly, this involved bits of balsa and lots of wood glue. To make sure the cabin was really secure I anchored it from beneath with a screw bolt.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3707.JPG
    DSCF3707.JPG
    114.9 KB · Views: 20
  • DSCF3710.JPG
    DSCF3710.JPG
    116 KB · Views: 14
  • DSCF3712.JPG
    DSCF3712.JPG
    112.3 KB · Views: 23
  • DSCF3718.JPG
    DSCF3718.JPG
    115.5 KB · Views: 18
  • DSCF3719.JPG
    DSCF3719.JPG
    117 KB · Views: 37

badsimmonds

Alphans
After my last post I realised I had forgotten something so this post should have come before the last, if that makes sense.
After I had shaped the perspex block for the windows I had to re configure the window slot. The rear window ends on an angle, this angle varies on the different versions of this vehicle. To achieve this I cut out grooves that would be deep enough for the 3mm perspex I'd be using as a fill in.
I was going to use plasticard but decided against as I thought it would be too flexible and not thick enough.
Once I glued it in place it was back to sanding and filling until it blended in with the rest of the cab. This took ages as usual as I was always finding faults, one of the reasons I chose perspex over plasticard was it was thicker and could tolerate a lot of sanding to get the right shape.
The window/perspex block will slide in behind this perspex filler so I don't need to shape the rear end of the window. As you can see in the last photo it looks about right, the same was done on the opposite side.
At this point I also sanded and fine tuned the top and bottom window 'sills' using filler, by fitting the window block in place I was able to add or subtract material to get a good fit.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3704.JPG
    DSCF3704.JPG
    117.3 KB · Views: 17
  • DSCF3700.JPG
    DSCF3700.JPG
    114.8 KB · Views: 10
  • DSCF3699.JPG
    DSCF3699.JPG
    114.1 KB · Views: 8
  • DSCF3698.JPG
    DSCF3698.JPG
    114.1 KB · Views: 9
Last edited:
Built to last.....

.....more fascinating construction techniques from the man himself. Really enjoyed the last two updates - thanks for all the photos and explanations. And just when I thought it was all about filler, balsa and glue, in came the screw bolt at the last minute just to make doubly sure.

Can't wait for the next episode,

Kindest regards

Patrick
 

Slate Mcleod

Alphans
The method I've chosen for the windows on this project is to use a chunk of solid perspex. This was the biggest piece of perspex I've worked with and being 1" thick it is quite heavy.
After fitting the block in place to see what needs to be removed I had no idea how I was going to achieve the required shape on something this size.
Firstly I reduced it in size using a rough saw (the only thing able to cut this) then started sanding. Normally I use my cordless drill for sanding but it did not have the kind of power output for this job so I had to buy an old fashioned electric drill. In the past I have sanded small pieces of perspex for windows and know that all cut edges can be polished up. My Shado Mobile windows were created this way, rough sand the shape then using finer and finer sandpaper, fine tune it then rub it like mad with brasso and then polish with Mr Sheen an hey presto a perfect polished cut end which looks as if it had been moulded that way, I even use the same method if a bit of glue gets on a window.
Back to this window and it took quite a while to sand using the drill, stopping every so often to fit in place and check progress. The perspex will melt with this type of work on it but that's not a problem as you just break it off when cool and start again. I know some people don't like working with the stuff but once you know how it will react it can be a boon to modellers and just treat it with care, I love the stuff.
Eventually I had the basic shape which looks not too bad, I won't polish it till later as its going to have a lot of handling mean time.

Genius with the perspex !!
 

badsimmonds

Alphans
When I built the chassis out of mdf some of the wood was too short so I knew I would have to join up the back of the tanker with the front section.
Its now time to do this and again I'm only using what I have lying around.
The area behind the cabin is never seen in Thunderbirds so I'm having to make this area up plus I want to make sense of where the fuel pipes come from later in the build.
Using just some ramin wood and mdf I joined the raised ridges along the rear section to the back edge of the cabin, as the cabin wall slopes in slightly these additions had to change from being vertical to matching this slope. Once dry it was sanded and filled, this took some time to get it to blend together, to be truthful I wasn't sure if this would work.
I also filled and sanded the ridge that extends along the length of the body which ends in this curving down by the front wheel arch. I just used filler to create this curve which took ages to get right but I think it turned out ok. The same work was done on the other side. Now that the front and rear sections are joined properly and primed its beginning to look like the tanker.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3731.JPG
    DSCF3731.JPG
    113.1 KB · Views: 30
  • DSCF3727.JPG
    DSCF3727.JPG
    116.4 KB · Views: 18
  • DSCF3723.JPG
    DSCF3723.JPG
    114.7 KB · Views: 12
  • DSCF3722.JPG
    DSCF3722.JPG
    116 KB · Views: 11
  • DSCF3721.JPG
    DSCF3721.JPG
    114.6 KB · Views: 11
Looking great.....

.....and getting better with every update. Lovely work, badsimmonds, lovely work. The ridge, as you describe it, looks really good, and what I really like about your work is the way some wee offcuts of wood, plastic and metal all just seem to melt into the bodywork, seamless and faultless. Waiting to see how you make the tanker part of it now!

Well done on another great build,

Kindest regards

Patrick
 

badsimmonds

Alphans
Thanks Patrick for the nice compliments. As you requested another update this time on the actual tanks themselves.
I had some EMA pipes in the garage which I bought a long time ago with the intention of building TB3, that never happened but now I can put them to good use.
I did have to order from EMA some saddles for the pipes to rest on and the end caps. EMA have a great selection of stuff though it is a bit expensive (for me anyway) plus you have to have a minimum order.
Once I had these parts it was just a matter of cutting the tube to length and fitting the end caps. I decided the entire section with the tanks would be removable so the saddles were glued onto a sheet of 4mm perspex which would just sit on the back. On either side of the tanks there is a Girder bridge part which 'holds' the tanks in place, fortunately I have a few bits of girder bridge lying around.
The area behind the cabin is never seen in this episode so I made up the detail to make it more interesting as I wanted the fuel pipes to appear properly as the TV episode has them coming from different areas depending on what is required, I wanted to make it look a bit more organised so you'll have to forgive me on this. For the detail I just used what I thought might be appropriate, again there are bits of girder bridge, OO platforms and parts of the casing from an old laptop.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF3740.JPG
    DSCF3740.JPG
    117.3 KB · Views: 14
  • DSCF3741.JPG
    DSCF3741.JPG
    114.1 KB · Views: 19
  • DSCF3744.JPG
    DSCF3744.JPG
    113 KB · Views: 15
  • DSCF3747.JPG
    DSCF3747.JPG
    105.1 KB · Views: 15
  • DSCF3808.JPG
    DSCF3808.JPG
    113.8 KB · Views: 19
Last edited:
Fascinating.....

......sometimes the wee bits you never got to see are the most fun - you can use your imagination and laptop casing parts! This vehicle is going to look stunning when completed, such is the care and attention being lavished on it.

Many thanks for the pictures badsimmonds,

Kindest regards

Pat
 

Slate Mcleod

Alphans
Badsimmonds, this is turning out to be a great replica, but one thing is bugging me and I felt I should point it out in case you feel the need to correct it before you get too far. The front cabin piece seems too long - either it is that or the front wheel arches. If you look at the side profile pic and then imagine a theoretical line going down from the end of the rear cabin window it appears to line up with where the rear part of the front wheel arch starts to curve. On your model there is a significant gap between where the windows end the wheel arch curve kicks in. I appreciate that this may not be an easy fix at this point in your work as you have already created the perspex part for the windows, so extending them back may not be an option. You may want to consider adjusting the front wheel arches though and shortening them some what so they align with the cabin windows ? Sorry if this news is not welcoming, I just did not know if you had spotted this or not.

EDIT : I think I have found a way you can correct this without (hopefully) too much hassle. If you remove a slice from the cabin approx where the lines are in the image below :



Then re-join both sections, you should end up with something like this :

 
Last edited:

badsimmonds

Alphans
Hi there

You are of course completely correct and I was aware of it but I thought 'what the hell'
The model is actually finished so I can't change anything. I'm not a modeller who worries about being 100% correct hence for example why I made up completely the area behind the cabin.
I don't really know why I didn't change it though its probably me being too lazy, on hindsight perhaps I should have. I have a tendency to rush through with my projects before I get too bored with it as I'm always thinking of the next project.
Your edited photo of the tanker does look good but as I said its too late.
 

Slate Mcleod

Alphans
Hey it's your model Badsimmonds and if you are happy with it that is all that counts mate. Could you post some photos of the completed build please ? I can't wait to see this all painted up !
 
Top