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Space:1999 - major flaws from the very start

CR

Alphans
In all seriousness, now, I find the tech lab door blowing outward and not converting the hapless crewman in the corridor into red paste to be laughably silly... as Paul said a little later: "Pressure in the Technical Area was up to eighty before we could activate the airlocks. It couldn't get out fast enough."

By the way, 80 what? PSI? I doubt that 80 PSI would rupture windows and doors like that. I'm guessing 80 times normal atmo pressure, but then that seems like a high amount of pressure for a rupture not to have occurred sooner.

In any event, that guy shouldn't have been in the shot; it just felt added in for dramatic effect. Imagine the drama of seeing the door blast off of its mount and rocket through the opposite wall, though! (Perhaps a bit beyond the episode's budget & SFX crew's safety capabilities.)
 
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Howard

Forum Supporter
Funny, light - hearted and serious all in one, Craig. Great post.
EDIT: I meant the one before that, must've posted almost simultaneously.
 
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VTracy

Alphans
Thanks for reminding us CR!:thumbup:

Of course, there are plenty of other "window" scenes on S99 to show the windows were not the variety shown in the Last Sunset.

I always thought it very realistic how they portrayed the sealing/patching of window cracks.
 

CR

Alphans
The forward shielding on the Eagles is an excellent point. One would have to believe it creates a kind of aerodynamic "cone" in front, allowing an Eagle to pass through an atmosphere with minimal friction. Had Koenig or Alan said something like "engage aero-shield for atmospheric re-entry" when entering a planet's atmosphere in a couple of episodes, that would have certainly helped cement that concept.
Hey, that's a good expansion of the idea, but I have one minor alternate suggestion: it seems a little technobabbled to have such a long explanatory description... after all, when the US space shuttle 'goes for throttle up,' the ground control and pilot don't say "Go throttle up for atmospheric exit & final escape velocity." It takes a little too long to say it and sounds awkward. (Kind of like me right now, not getting to the point!) A more subtle version (in the very episode "Ring Around the Moon") might have been: "We've boosted the Eagle's re-entry shield to help you break through." And leave it at that. Attentive viewers would have simply extrapolated that the Eagles always have such shields--and that they are not visible under normal conditions--without a technobabble explanation.

As an aside, the novelization of that episode placed it prior to "Black Sun," a change I actually agree with because of how tense the Alphans seem after having lost a potential home on Terra Nova. Anyway, as the novelization later moved into the "Black Sun" portion, it mentioned that the Bergman Shield was a partial adaptation of the strengthened Eagle shield from "RAtM." Kind of a neat idea.

EDITED TO ADD: The actual episode's announcement of the shield is from Victor: "Oh, John. The anti-gravity screen will neutralise the force field. It'll make a sort of tunnel, or a corridor, that will allow you to pass through and land." So I guess it was already technobabbly, and at the same time, useless: what anti-gravity screen? Keeping most of the original dialogue intact, the re-done version might have been: "Oh, John. We've boosted the Eagle's re-entry screens to neutralise the force field. It'll make a sort of tunnel, or a corridor, that will allow you to pass through and land."
Come to think of it, much of that episode involved a lot of 'padding,' so it isn't really surprising that the descriptions were a bit long.
 
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gundaRn

Alphans
I think everyone wearing flared trousers to work in the year 1999 is pushing the boundaries of credibility.
I'm willing to forgive everything else.
 

gwent

Alphans
The biggest hurdle for me in any sci-fi series including this one is the ability of all aliens to understand and speak fluent English.

It's a bit more forgivable in a show like Star Trek:TNG because of so many members of the Federation, so it is easier to accept that English could be a primary language of all Federation planets. But there is no Federation in Space:1999. There is absolutely no reason why aliens on the other side of a Black Sun in some distant part of space happens to be familiar with English.

Sure you could explain maybe once or twice that some alien race has the ability to scan Computer for language information, but when every alien race knows how to speak English, well, that's hard to swallow even for a huge sc-fi fan like myself.

But I guess that's one of those things you just have to overcome and ignore if you're ever going to enjoy sci-fi.
 

Cellini

Alphans
The language problem is present in all sci-fi shows for screenplay reasons. There is always a telepath, a computer device or a tardis ready to translate for the audience...

What is less forgivable is the way the actors pronounce Verdeschi's name. In an episode it is mentioned he is Italian; therefore the right pronunciation should be 'Verdeski' and not 'Verdeshi". Now, I understand the other Alphans are of different nationalities and can make the mistake but how about Tony calling himself in the wrong way? ;)
The correction was made in the Italian dubbing. On the other hand, in the Italian version Helena, for some mysterious reason, is called Helen. :O

P.S. I am Italian
 

cytherians

Alphans
Those pesky little details... I did indeed miss them. I guess it just wasn't prominent enough, the cue that Koenig was having some of the windows replaced so that they could be opened. Of course, why would they have any hardware to support such a window on Moonbase is a bit laughable. I would have done it like this:

Morrow: "Commander, we have some spare movable windows in hydroponics. We could retrofit a few of them on the outer windows to allow outside air to flow inside."
Koenig: "Paul, that's a great idea. Get on it right away."
 

CR

Alphans
Those pesky little details... I did indeed miss them. I guess it just wasn't prominent enough, the cue that Koenig was having some of the windows replaced so that they could be opened. Of course, why would they have any hardware to support such a window on Moonbase is a bit laughable. I would have done it like this:

Morrow: "Commander, we have some spare movable windows in hydroponics. We could retrofit a few of them on the outer windows to allow outside air to flow inside."
Koenig: "Paul, that's a great idea. Get on it right away."
I don't know... again, the evidence of that one window being replaced is there in the actual episode, though the viewer must pay attention. But more important, adding more expositionary/explanatory detail isn't really furthering the plot at all. I suspect that's why the 'reseal the window' line was deleted, too.

You do seem to find a lot 'laughable' with this series and its flaws, and as some of us have already pointed out, the series is certainly not without faults. I suppose the series is MST3K-worthy (they did do one of the Season 2 compilation 'movies,' as I recall), but that's not what most of us watch the show for. Just sayin'.
To clarify: I'm not saying one can't have a difference of opinion nor vocalise criticism, but this forum isn't exactly a 'bashing' site, so there may not be much agreement, and certainly not much willingness to keep discussions in that vein. Pointing out faults and coming up with solutions to them has always occurred, and as far as I'm concerned, shall always continue (using myself as an example, I've often made known my dislike for Season 2, but I've also pointed out some of its better points). But bear in mind that most members here have a love for this series, warts and all.
 
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VTracy

Alphans
The fact that Space: 1999 is packed with scientific inaccuracies (and an infinite number of bloopers) is notorious to the fans. However, I think we like the series for other reasons.
Yesterday I watched End of Eternity, one of the most brilliant episodes in the entire series. The fact that, at the end of the story, Balor (whose psycho-brightness is wonderfully portrayed by Peter Bowles) is sucked out to space is a big mistake as he should actually land on the moon surface does not minimise the great entertaining value of the episode where the theme of immortality is explored together with other political and moral issues. That is why the series (season 1 mostly) I think is remembered and appreciated: more for its way to discuss ethical, social and philosophical themes rather than its, undenyable, scientific inaccuracies.

Funny you should mention this, as I also just re-watched this episode a few days ago.

I have a theory that Balor wouldn't be on the moon or in orbit at all, but rather that he's back in his asteroid prison.

After Balor is sucked out the airlock, the Alphans blow up the asteroid. It then reforms, as Bergman showed earlier in the episode.

I don't know why they would bother to show us an empty asteroid reforming. Who would care about that?

I think this is to suggest that the prison is reformed and Balor is back inside.

No sure if this has been discussed before.:think:
 

ALPHA ONE

Alphans
Scientific inaccuracies of Space.

Good point! Maybe there's some sort of Physical link between Balor and the Asteroid?:think:

Speaking of Inaccuracies,:hmm:

Can someone please explain to me why is it we see The Swift Pilot Ship on the surface of the moon in Bringers of Wonder PT.2 rather than an Eagle?:think:
 

Steve Gerard

Alphans
Good point! Maybe there's some sort of Physical link between Balor and the Asteroid?:think:

Speaking of Inaccuracies,:hmm:

Can someone please explain to me why is it we see The Swift Pilot Ship on the surface of the moon in Bringers of Wonder PT.2 rather than an Eagle?:think:


Due to the episodes direction, we see the illusion of the Pilot ship http://space1999.net/catacombs/main/epimg/tibow22.html until the scene where Koenig looks on the Commpost screen to see the Eagle:
http://space1999.net/catacombs/main/epimg/tibow23.html
 

Cellini

Alphans
Funny you should mention this, as I also just re-watched this episode a few days ago.

I have a theory that Balor wouldn't be on the moon or in orbit at all, but rather that he's back in his asteroid prison.

After Balor is sucked out the airlock, the Alphans blow up the asteroid. It then reforms, as Bergman showed earlier in the episode.

I don't know why they would bother to show us an empty asteroid reforming. Who would care about that?

I think this is to suggest that the prison is reformed and Balor is back inside.

No sure if this has been discussed before.:think:

Interesting and likeable theory. Actually, the episode shows Balor floating in space after being ejected out the airlock and his body could have been "gravitationally" attracted by the asteroid.
However, if Balor were gone back to the asteroid, it would have been evil (out of character, anyway) of the Alphans to blow him up with the asteroid and silly as well as they knew that he couldn't die anyway and the asteroid would reform. I think it is more likely that there is some scene/dialogue missing that had to provide a better explanation for the end of this episode. Original script, anyone?
 

CR

Alphans
Interesting ideas, VTracy & Cellini. I wonder if the Powys Books 'Eternity Trilogy' did anything along these lines... has anybody read them? (And please post SPOILER WARNINGS before discussing the books, as many people have not yet read them. Thanks!)
As an aside, I understand that there's an expanded novel based around "Dragon's Domain" available in Italy. Any chance of an English translation becoming available? I'd love to read it.
 

Cellini

Alphans
Interesting ideas, VTracy & Cellini. I wonder if the Powys Books 'Eternity Trilogy' did anything along these lines... has anybody read them? (And please post SPOILER WARNINGS before discussing the books, as many people have not yet read them. Thanks!)
As an aside, I understand that there's an expanded novel based around "Dragon's Domain" available in Italy. Any chance of an English translation becoming available? I'd love to read it.

Are you referring to the novelisations by Gianni Padoan? If so, these were produced in the mid-70s straight after the first broadcast of Spazio: 1999. I have most of them but not all; unfortunately, I don't have the one with the "Dragon's domain" but I do remember that Cellini's name was changed into something else. I'll be back to you if I find more info.
 

Cellini

Alphans
Interesting ideas, VTracy & Cellini. I wonder if the Powys Books 'Eternity Trilogy' did anything along these lines... has anybody read them? (And please post SPOILER WARNINGS before discussing the books, as many people have not yet read them. Thanks!)
As an aside, I understand that there's an expanded novel based around "Dragon's Domain" available in Italy. Any chance of an English translation becoming available? I'd love to read it.

I have checked Gianni Padoan's Italian novelisation; there are no further details on Balor's expulsion. The mystery remains unsolved...
 
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