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"Trapped in the Sky" recreation

tryptych

Alphans
Nice display of depth of field, in this picture! :yes:

Thanks. Yes, I try to match the camera as best as possible (Lens focal length, film grade etc.)
I know they used to use prime lenses stopped down with a ton of light, but back then they just weren't that fast so there was always going to be a fairly shallow depth of field, so I have tried to match it from the original. Also, they were shooting at 120 frames per second, so the film gets very little exposure.

PS: YAY!! All my pics are back!!
Thank you to all those responsible for fixing my hosts cock-up.
I would appreciate any of you that haven't seen my "Trapped in the Sky" thread to take a look and offer any critique you may have.
 
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Tenement01

Alphans
This is the revamp of my original test shot.
The Elevator car is now rigged on all six wheels with a bouncy roof, steering and suspension. Now I am trying to get the Jetex exhaust smoke to look right, and it's tricky, but should have an update soon.

The image is incredible. What simulated aperture and lens did you use for the shot? (Is the film grain a post effect in Photoshop or can you simulate film stock in 3DSMax) Brilliant work!
 

tryptych

Alphans
I did a number of tests when I first started this where I did 3D motion tracks of the show and by looking at parallax shift it can determine focal length. This worked out at either a 24mm or 35mm lenses in almost all cases (on a 35mm film plane). Remember back then they only used fixed prime lenses - no zooms - and the speed of the lenses wouldn't be as good as today's so probably an f4 aperture, and probably a fairly slow shutter speed (1/50th - 1/100th) too as there tends to be a fair amount of motion blur.

As I am creating animation rather than stills, I am compositing in Adobe After Effects instead of Photoshop, but essentially it's the same principle.
I have found using post-processing in 3DSMax or any other 3D package to be slow and pointless, because once it's on, you cannot remove it. I generate a number of render passes including Alpha, GI, Shadow, Ambient Occlusion and Z-Depth which allow me to tweak the look. I also often render separate elements like the foreground and background separately to allow more control. To create the Depth of field effect, I use a Camera Blur effect which Photoshop has as well, so you add the Z-Depth as a layer, make a selection via one of the RGB channels, create a copy layer of the shot, and use the selection as a layer mask. Then apply Camera Blur and use the layer as your matte. Then you can adjust the focus point and blur amount as required. I find it is often handy to auto-level the Z-Depth pass first to give you the best dynamic range.



As for grain and colouration, I have some pretty fancy plugins for After Effects, Dark Energy Matter for the grain and Magic Bullet for the grading. However, there is an excellent plugin for Photoshop that can do a really good version called Exposure. It simulates all kinds of film stock and effects. https://www.alienskin.com/exposure/

Hope that helps!
 
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Tenement01

Alphans
Brilliant tutorial! I used to try and do everything in LW at the render stage but as you say, it really limits what you can do with the image so I've weaned myself to working on the picture in post.
 

tryptych

Alphans
It's a common newbie 3D modeller's mistake. (I actually know many that have only used beauty passes like that for years.) Render passes are really important in the post phase; It's how all pro VFX is done. They go for the full monty of diffuse, specular, metallic etc which I only tend to do for stills. It means if your render isn't spot on, it can be tweaked quite a lot rather than spending hours re-rendering. In my case I also do it to save a lot of time as I only need to render the background the once so the animated bits get rendered much quicker.

I would also do an Ambient occlusion pass as well as you can bring this into Photoshop as a layer on top and set it to multiply, then back off the opacity. It adds a lot more detail and contrast to the image and really makes it "punch". The other trick I do is use the Z-Depth as a mask for an HSB adjustment layer (below the DoF blur) as more distant objects tend to be a bit lighter and more desaturated, and it helps add a more realistic depth to a shot.

Here's a video using Max/Vray, but I'm sure Lightwave has similar render pass settings.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0WpIzi8sc4

Oh, and here's how to do the Depth of Field. They use a channel rather than a layer mask, but it's the same thing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj2Da5AjUM8
 
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